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CFP: WLA Panel at SSAWW Conference

Society for the Study of American Women Writers & Université Bordeaux Montaigne

5th – 8th July 2017

Venue: Université Bordeaux Montaigne, France

The Western Literature Association invites submissions for its upcoming panel at the international meeting of the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, July 5-8, 2017 in Bordeaux, France.

You can learn more about the conference here: https://ssawwnew.wordpress.com/2015/11/16/ssaww-conference-in-bordeaux/

In response to the conference theme of “Border Crossings: Translation, Migration, & Gender in the Americas, the Transatlantic, & the Transpacific,” we welcome papers that consider how women writers respond to the ideological and imaginative boundaries that have shaped western American literary and cultural production. Proposed papers might address but are not limited to the following topics:

• gender, genre, and the West
• 
negotiations of racial, ethnic, and religious difference in western women’s writing
• women writers and the geographic and chronological definitions of the West
• archival and recovery work in the field of western women’s writing
• women writers and the post-western West

E-mail a 300-word abstract and brief CV to Cathryn Halverson (clh@hum.ku.dk) by May 15, 2016. While you do not need to be an SSAWW or WLA member to submit a proposal, you must be or become a member of both SSAWW and WLA in order to present as part of this panel.


CFP // SWAMP SOUTHS: LITERARY AND CULTURAL ECOLOGIES (Edited Collection)

A decade ago, two groundbreaking works seriously introduced the representation of swamps in literature and popular culture into critical discussion: Tynes Cowan’s The Slave in the Swamp: Disrupting the Plantation Narrative (2005) and Anthony Wilson’s Shadow and Shelter: The Swamp in Southern Culture (2006). Since the publication of these volumes, developments in geocritical, ecocritical, posthumanist, and critical animal studies; continued developments in scholarship on Native American cultures and literatures; new novels, poems, films, television programs, comics, and other cultural productions; further developments in the new Southern Studies; and rapidly changing ecological circumstances (the escalating disappearance of coastal wetlands, as well as the impacts of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe) have all presented new vocabularies and critical frameworks uniquely suited to furthering thinking about swamps. In light of these developments and in order to revisit and continue the critical examination of swamps, we believe this is a good moment to bring together the insights of multiple scholars in a collection: Swamp Souths: Literary and Cultural Ecologies. A major university press has confirmed interest in this project.

The editors—Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, Kirstin Squint, and Anthony Wilson—invite a wide range of essays that consider swamps in literature and popular culture from any era. The following ideas are provided as guidance:

• geocritical, ecocritical, posthumanist, critical animal studies frameworks
• comparative transnational or global studies approaches
• Southern swamps as “shelter” for runaway slaves, American Indians, Cajuns, and other marginalized peoples
• the implications of global climate change on human populations indigenous to Southern swamps such as the Seminole, Miccosukee, Houma, and Point au Chien peoples
• swamp-centric narratives as reflections of the impact of global climate change
• portrayals of Southern swamps in television and movies, particularly as a result of the evolution of “Hollywood South”
• portrayals of Southern swamps in regional music including Cajun and zydeco or in popular music by artists such as Tab Benoit, Hank Williams, and others
• the ways that genre fiction writers such as James Lee Burke, Anne Rice, Carl Hiaasen, and Randy Wayne White use swamps as narrative tools
• how artistic and cultural artifacts such as Chitimacha baskets or the paintings of George Rodrigue reflect and tell stories about swamps
• why monsters, ghosts, vampires, and loup garou so often populate narratives of Southern swamps

500 word proposals should be sent to editors Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, Kirstin Squint, and Anthony Wilson at swampsouths@gmail.com by June 15, 2016.

For those asked to contribute to the collection, we anticipate that completed essays of approximately 5,000-6,000 words will be due by June 15, 2017. Proposals from both established and emerging scholars are welcomed, as is work from multiple perspectives and disciplines. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

 


CFP - Studies in the Novel

Special Issue: “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West” 

Deadline for submissions: 9/1/2016

Studies in the Novel is currently seeking submissions for a special issue on “Gender and the Cultural Preoccupations of the American West,” guest edited by Sigrid Anderson Cordell (University of Michigan) and Carrie Johnston (Bucknell University), which will be published in fall 2017.

This special issue examines the novel as a tool of political engagement through which women writers have challenged prevalent notions of the American West as masculine, antimodern, and untouched. Even thirty years after Annette Kolodny’s foundational study The Land Before Her, recent work by Nina Baym and Krista Comer has shown there is considerable work to be done to account for women writers’ engagement with the West as an imaginative and political space. Likewise, new directions in gender studies, border theory, settler colonialism, and critical regionalism have made new conversations about the Western as a literary genre increasingly urgent.

We invite contributions that examine the ways that women novelists have located themselves in the West—both imaginatively and geographically—asking how these narratives have engaged cultural “preoccupations” with the West as an extension of the predominantly white, masculine public sphere. Examining these narratives, contributors will also evaluate gendered representations of the longstanding contested nature of the “occupation” of western territories and, more recently, US borders.

Possible topics include:

  • Women’s writing and borderlands
  • Gender and settler colonialism
  • Intersections of post-feminism, the post-western, and the post-racial
  • Novels about the West as spaces for debate
  • New readings of canonical western women writers like Willa Cather and Mary Austin
  • Ways that the critical landscape shifts by paying attention to neglected texts
  • New readings of under-read women writers
  • Women writers and the post-West or post-regionalism
  • Globalization and the novel
  • Visualities in women’s novels about the West
  • The Western novel as a gendered genre
  • The gendering of anthropology in narratives about the West

Submissions should be sent in MS Word, devoid of personal identifying information. Manuscripts should be 8,000-10,000 words in length, inclusive of endnotes and Works Cited, have standard formatting (1” margins, double-spaced throughout, etc.), and conform to the latest edition of the MLA Style Manual. Endnotes should be as brief and as limited in number as possible. Illustrations may accompany articles; high-resolution digital files (JPEGs preferred) must be provided upon article acceptance. All copyright permissions must be obtained by the author prior to publication.

Questions and submissions should be sent to studiesinthenovel@unt.edu.

The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2016.


Open Access to the
Encyclopedia of American Studies

Published by Johns Hopkins University Press for the American Studies Association (ASA), the Encyclopedia of American Studies covers the history, philosophy, arts, and cultures of the United States in relation to the world, from pre-colonial days to the present, from various perspectives and the global American Studies movement. With over 800 online, searchable articles and accompanying bibliographies, related websites, illustrations, and supplemental material, the Encyclopedia of American Studies is the leading reference work for American Studies. Access to content on this site is open to the public and is subject to copyright protection.

 

 

 

 

  • Western Literature Association (WLA)

    Founded in 1965, the Western Literature Association (WLA) is a non-profit, scholarly association that promotes the study of the diverse literature and cultures of the North American West, past and present.

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  • Western American Literature (WAL)

    (The Journal)

    Published by the Western Literature Association, Western American Literature is the leading journal in western American literary studies.

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